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From 6 to 8 March 2018 we will be exhibiting at the Foam Expo in Novi, MI.  As North America’s leading exhibition and conference for the technical foam manufacturing supply chain, it brings together manufacturers, buyers, products and services for the entire foam manufacturing industry. The TeraMetrixTM T-Ray® 5000 online sensor is the only single sensor that can measure thickness and density simultaneously.

TeraMetrix-FoamExpo_535pxCoupled with the user friendly T-Gauge® software package, the T-Ray 5000 becomes a unique tool for controlling the manufacturing process or confirming the quality of manufactured foams.  The operating speed of the gauge is 100 Hz or faster depending on the configuration, and the product being examined.  That high speed of data acquisition allows online process control.

Come and see a live demo of the T-Gauge® sensor at booth 543 in the main hall and bring your production line under control.

The space environment poses significant challenges to technology platforms, space exploration, and mission assurance. Mission planners are continually striving to push technologies further to explore new and environmentally harsh regions of the universe. Highly charged environments can exist at Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO), Medium Earth Orbit (MEO), and Polar Low Earth Orbit (PLEO) owing to solar winds/storms and charged particles trapped in Earth’s radiation belts.1-3 Just as there are numerous threats and sources of radiation in Earth’s orbit, deep space missions encounter radiation levels that can exceed the performance capabilities of current technology platforms. A possible future mission to explore Jupiter’s moon Europa, for example, would encounter radiation levels seven times greater than Earth’s orbit. There is a specific need for advanced materials to protect sensitive spacecraft electronics from harsh energetic conditions across a variety of different mission platforms. To serve this need, Luna has developed a charge dissipating conformal coating to enable greater radiation hardening and electrostatic discharge (ESD) mitigation for spacecraft electronics. 

The developed coating (termed “LUNA XP-CD) meets the required volume resistivity of 1×108 – 1×1012 ohm-cm for ESD protection across a wide temperature range (see Figure 1), is optically transparent, inspectable under ultraviolet light, easy to apply and repair, provides low outgassing, and has excellent adhesion and flexibility. The coating offers performance properties of both common conformal coating protection and radiation hardening through ESD mitigation. The addition of ESD protection in a single conformal coating gives spacecraft designers a new tool to protect sensitive electronics from hazardous radiation environments, while simultaneously reducing spacecraft complexity, weight, and cost.

Figure 1: The LUNA XP-CD coating applied to an IPC-B-25A test board (left), and example room temperature volume resistivity data for the coating obtained via ASTM D257 testing acquired by The Aerospace Corporation (right). Note the blue band in the plot represents the average resistivity over time.
Figure 1: The LUNA XP-CD coating applied to an IPC-B-25A test board (left), and example room temperature volume resistivity data for the coating obtained via ASTM D257 testing acquired by The Aerospace Corporation (right). Note the blue band in the plot represents the average resistivity over time.

 

Charge dissipation testing was performed by the NASA Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) using a custom electron gun test method that charges materials with up to 100 keV and then measures ESD events and surface potentials. Testing was also performed on a commercial polyurethane conformal coating often used for space missions (Uralane 5750) and compared to the Luna XP-CD coating. Potential decay plots as a function of time are shown in Figure 2 for each coating. The Luna XP-CD product provided a substantial reduction in retained charge at both early times (35V for Luna XP-CD vs. >4000V for the Uralane after ~1 hour) and later times (15V for Luna XP-CD vs. ~1000V for the Uralane after 24 hours or 1440 minutes).

Figure 2: Plots of surface potential decay over time for the LUNA-XP-CD charge dissipating conformal coating (left) compared to a common space-qualified conformal coating (right). The Luna coating provides substantially reduced potentials over time.
Figure 2: Plots of surface potential decay over time for the LUNA-XP-CD charge dissipating conformal coating (left) compared to a common space-qualified conformal coating (right). The Luna coating provides substantially reduced potentials over time.

 

Luna has partnered with NASA Langley Research Center to evaluate the charge dissipating coating on the upcoming Shields-1 CubeSat mission.4 A CubeSat is a miniaturized satellite that enables cost-efficient research on space technology. The mission will serve as a test bed for a variety of radiation protective materials. A successful mission will pave the way for future programs to utilize the Luna coating for electronics protection during GEO, MEO, Polar LEO and Outer Planets exploratory missions.

 The coating was developed through a NASA STTR project under Contract #NNX11C129P.5 For more information on Luna’s XP-CD charge dissipating coating, please contact Adam Goff at 434-220-2513 or goffa@lunainc.com

  1. Stassinopoulos, E. G. & Raymond, J. P. The space radiation environment for electronics. IEEE 76, 1423–1442 (1988).
  2. Johnston, A. H. Radiation effects in advanced microelectronics technologies. IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 45, 1339–1354 (1998).
  3. Zeynali, O., Masti, D. & Gandomkar, S. Shielding protection of electronic circuits against radiation effects of space high energy particles. Appl. Sci. Res. 3, 446–451 (2012).
  4. https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20160006374.pdf
  5. Charge Dissipating Transparent Conformal Coatings for Spacecraft Electronics (NASA Phase I SBIR, Contract# NNX11CI29P).

Picometrix® is a name synonymous with state of the art terahertz systems.  With release of the first commercially available terahertz system in 2000, Picometrix established itself as the world leader in fiber coupled terahertz.  Now with a 4th generation product on the market, and our world leading position in industrial process control, we are changing our name.  Under the same leadership and technical team, we are now TeraMetrixTM in recognition of increased focus on our terahertz product line.TeraMetrix_Logo

Through the merger of Advanced Photonix, Inc. with Luna Innovations, Inc., TeraMetrix is now a division of Luna Innovations (NASDAQ: LUNA).  The T-Ray 5000 product line of TeraMetrix fits perfectly into the suite of fiber optic test and sensing products of Luna.

With strong support from Luna, we have a full schedule of exhibits and demonstrations covering a variety of applications including industrial process control, non-destructive testing, aerospace, and research.

Keep your eye on this blog for updates on the advanced features of our products and the opportunities to see them in action.

(ROANOKE, VA, January 25, 2018) – Luna Innovations Incorporated (NASDAQ: LUNA) is pleased to announce its recent hire of Margaret Murdock, who has joined TeraMetrix™, a division of Luna in Ann Arbor, Michigan, as General Manager. Murdock will accelerate the development and global commercialization of the terahertz product platform for the industrial process control environments, aerospace and non-destructive testing (NDT) markets.  

“TeraMetrix is a growing division of Luna, and we are poised commercially to execute and expand our reach,” said Murdock. “The TeraMetrix team has successfully translated proven concepts into robust terahertz products with a wide range of applications from specialty coatings in defense to quality of asphalt shingles to multi-layer thickness in blow-molded products. I’m privileged to lead such a high-performing organization.”

With more than 20 years of experience in strategic leadership of global strategies for innovative product development, engineering and manufacturing, Murdock has successfully optimized organizations’ capabilities by initiating quality management systems, implementing Lean Six Sigma principles and identifying actionable change designed to meet customer satisfaction. As a former General Manager at Picometrix, LLC, Murdock was on the leading edge of terahertz instrumentation application development and initial technology adoption into industrial markets.

“As the TeraMetrix division focuses on meeting the specifications for penetrating additional industrial process control markets, Margaret’s leadership in assessing processes, noting opportunities for improvement and optimizing profitability will be invaluable,” said Scott Graeff, President and CEO of Luna Innovations.  “Under Margaret’s guidance, TeraMetrix is poised for critical growth in multiple industry sectors.”

“I am very excited for this opportunity to lead TeraMetrix,” Murdock said. “Our resources and talent position us to capitalize on our current opportunities and accelerate our future growth.”

About Luna:

Luna Innovations Incorporated (www.lunainc.com) is a leader in optical technology, providing unique capabilities in high speed optoelectronics and high performance fiber optic test products for the telecommunications industry and distributed fiber optic sensing for the aerospace and automotive industries. Luna is organized into two business segments which work closely together to turn ideas into products: a Technology Development segment and a Products and Licensing segment. Luna’s business model is designed to accelerate the process of bringing new and innovative technologies to market.

Forward-Looking Statements:

The statements in this release that are not historical facts constitute “forward-looking statements” made pursuant to the safe harbor provision of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 that involve risks and uncertainties. These statements include the company’s expectations Luna’s growth strategy, the expansion of its operations and its future operating performance. Management cautions the reader that these forward-looking statements are only predictions and are subject to a number of both known and unknown risks and uncertainties, and actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements as a result of a number of factors. These factors include, without limitation, failure of demand for the company’s products and services to meet expectations, technological challenges and those risks and uncertainties set forth in the company’s periodic reports and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Such filings are available on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov and on the company’s website at www.lunainc.com. The statements made in this release are based on information available to the company as of the date of this release and Luna undertakes no obligation to update any of the forward-looking statements after the date of this release.

###

Investor Contact:

Dale Messick, CFO
Luna Innovations Incorporated
Phone: 1.540.769.8400
Email: IR@lunainc.com

 

The pulsed terahertz systems made by our TeraMetrix division (formerly Picometrix) have been deployed into more than 30 industrial plants manufacturing plastic products.  Terahertz gauges can make multiple measurements simultaneously and provide higher precision than other methods.  Most often, the terahertz gauge is used to measure the thickness of each layer of a multilayer product, but it can also detect the delamination between those layers.

terahertz_t-gauge_lunaThis means that a terahertz gauge can replace multiple measurement systems on a manufacturing line.

As this is a relatively new technology to the manufacturers of plastic parts, it was chosen to be the cover article in the Nov/Dec issue of Plastics Engineering, one of the trade publications of the Society of Plastics Engineers.

http://www.plasticsengineering.org/index.aspx

While the article gives a general description of the types of terahertz systems and interviews a number of gauging system providers, the T-Gauge sensors of TeraMetrix are the only currently deployed pulsed terahertz sensors in the world today.

With over 50 pulsed terahertz systems deployed in manufacturing, it is clear that T-Gauge sensors are a game changing addition to the technology of online measurement.

March 6-8, 2018
Suburban Showplace Collection | Novi, Michigan
Booth #:  543

http://www.foam-expo.com/

Come and see a live demo of the T-Gauge® sensor at booth 543 in the main hall and bring your production line under control.

Expands Luna’s high-definition fiber optic sensing into manufacturing and multi-channel applications

(ROANOKE, VA, December 12, 2017)  As the automotive and aerospace industries demand advanced measurement systems to enable lightweight designs, Luna Innovations Incorporated (NASDAQ: LUNA) launches its enhanced ODiSI 6100 proprietary strain and temperature measurement technology for integration into these industrial environments that place strict requirements on scalability, usability, interoperability, and overall system stability.

Unlike traditional electrical strain gages and thermocouples, the ODiSI 6100 Platform (Optical Distributed Sensor Interrogator) employs next generation fiber optic technology for distributed, multi-point, ultrahigh-definition profiling of strain and temperature.  ODiSI fiber optic sensors are small, lightweight and economical, enabling greatly reduced cost of sensor installation and the ability to embed sensors directly within materials and structures.

The enhancements included with the ODiSI 6100 strain and temperature measurement platform include minimized per-sensor cost, increased multi-channel capability, increased sensor length, increased speed of output, and real time 3-D data visualization software for computer model calibration.

“Automotive and aerospace R&D and manufacturing teams are incorporating composite and other lightweight materials into new designs at an increasing rate, requiring higher measurement performance in less time,” said Scott Graeff, president and chief executive officer of Luna Innovations. “Luna’s game-changing technology targets this need and addresses the major challenges faced by the aerospace and automotive industries as they incorporate new materials into modern designs.”

The customer feedback-driven ODiSI 6100 Platform now includes integrated, multi-channel capability up to 8 channels, millimeter resolution with up to 38,000 measurement points per channel, sensor length ranges from 2.5 m to 50 m per channel, a new, completely redesigned user interface with intuitive user controls operating on the LinuxTM operating system, and real-time data output at rates up to 250 Hz.  Optional 3-D Visualization Software allows strain and temperature data to be integrated seamlessly with CAD models and plotted and manipulated in three dimensions for the ultimate in computer-aided design. 

“ODiSI 6100 greatly enhances the engineer’s ability to maximize the performance of critical processes and next generation designs,” Graeff added. “ODiSI fiber optic sensors are small, nearly weightless and carry no electricity so they can go where electrical sensors cannot. With its high channel count, ODiSI 6100 replaces cumbersome and expensive strain gage data acquisition systems with a single, continuous, small form-factor sensor per channel. Because fiber optic sensors can also measure temperature, the ODiSI 6100 is also ideal for continuous, high-definition temperature profiling for industrial processes that rely on precise temperature control.”

Luna will be demonstrating the ODiSI 6100 at the CAMX tradeshow in Orlando, Florida this week in booth G79.  More information on the ODiSI 6100 including application case studies and product literature can be found here: http://lunainc.com/product/sensing-solutions/odisi-6100/

About Luna:

Luna Innovations Incorporated (www.lunainc.com) is a leader in optical technology, providing unique capabilities in high speed optoelectronics and high performance fiber optic test products for the telecommunications industry and distributed fiber optic sensing for the aerospace and automotive industries.  Luna is organized into two business segments, which work closely together to turn ideas into products: a Technology Development segment and a Products and Licensing segment. Luna’s business model is designed to accelerate the process of bringing new and innovative technologies to market.

Forward-Looking Statements:

The statements in this release that are not historical facts constitute “forward-looking statements” made pursuant to the safe harbor provision of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 that involve risks and uncertainties. These statements include the company’s expectations regarding the greater performance and new capabilities of the enhanced ODiSI platform, as well as Luna’s strategy to become the leading supplier of sensor testing for testing composites and other advanced materials. Management cautions the reader that these forward-looking statements are only predictions and are subject to a number of both known and unknown risks and uncertainties, and actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements as a result of a number of factors. These factors include, without limitation, failure of demand for the company’s products and services to meet expectations, technological challenges and those risks and uncertainties set forth in the company’s periodic reports and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Such filings are available on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov and on the company’s website at www.lunainc.com. The statements made in this release are based on information available to the company as of the date of this release and Luna undertakes no obligation to update any of the forward-looking statements after the date of this release.

Investor Contact:

Dale Messick, CFO
Luna Innovations Incorporated
Phone: 1.540.769.8400
Email: IR@lunainc.com

 

 

Ethan Thompson, Kevin Farinholt

Figure 1: An example of a highly corroded ballast tank (image from: http://www.charismauae.net/projects_gal.php?Pid=2).
Figure 1: An example of a highly corroded ballast tank (image from: http://www.charismauae.net/projects_gal.php?Pid=2).

Approximately 4,000 ballast tanks across the U.S. Navy’s fleet must be inspected annually to determine their structural health and identify the presence of corrosion (Figure 1). These inspection efforts cost approximately $200 million dollars a year, with about 50% of the cost attributed to unexpected or unplanned repairs. The U.S. military is looking to transition from time-based inspection practices to condition-based maintenance for the next-generation Columbia-class nuclear submarines to reduce operating and maintenance costs.

Current maintenance practices involve visual inspections of the four major areas of the ballast tanks – tank tops, bottoms, sides, and T-beams, with four ballast tank locations common to most submarine designs (Figure 2).  Ratings are given to each area as to the integrity of protective coatings and presence of corrosion, with ratings ranging from 0.03% – 10% deterioration.  The overall condition of a tank is then assessed according to the rating for the most deteriorated region within the volume.  Based on size and severity of damage, areas within the ballast tank will be flagged for mandatory repair or replacement should conditions exceed limits established within the Navy’s Corrosion Control Assessment and Maintenance Manual.

Figure 2: Ballast tank locations common to most submarine designs. (https://commons.wikimedia.org)
Figure 2: Ballast tank locations common to most submarine designs. (https://commons.wikimedia.org)

 

Luna is developing a technologically-rooted condition-based monitoring system for ballast tank coating damage (Figure 3).  The development leverages hardware, software, and modeling techniques used across many of Luna’s corrosion and equipment health monitoring programs.  The system incorporates autonomous monitoring of the interior protective coatings, and is expected to reduce labor cost, as well as provide operators a tool to understand the extent and location of the damage as it evolves. Luna has developed an embedded solution that utilizes a custom hardware design integrated with a graphical user interface to test and evaluate performance of the tank’s protective coating.  Once data has been collected, it is fed through a neural network algorithm that estimates the defect size and position within the tank.

Figure 3: Graphical representation of Luna’s embedded coating condition monitoring system.
Figure 3: Graphical representation of Luna’s embedded coating condition monitoring system.

 

Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to monitor the electrical response of protective coatings and the saltwater contents they interact with within the ballast tank itself, collecting measurements over a frequency range from 500 Hz to 100 kHz.  From these measurements, specific frequencies are correlated with defect size and separation distance for each of the sensor nodes.  Data collected from multiple nodes is then transmitted to a central sensor hub where neural network algorithms are used to triangulate damage position and estimate its severity within the tank, providing an overall assessment for the tank (Figure 4). The system outputs a damage severity rating and provides maintainers locations within the tank that require further inspection or repair.

Figure 4: Neural network modeling used in the coating condition monitoring system.
Figure 4: Neural network modeling used in the coating condition monitoring system.

 

Experiments have been conducted on 1D, 2D, and 3D test stands in the laboratory.  Physical scaled models of rectangular tanks have been fabricated for testing at Luna’s Charlottesville facility, and studied under a range of saltwater concentrations to simulate a range of operating conditions.  Four- and five-node sensor arrays have been installed within each test stand, and a system was designed to quickly install and reposition simulated defects at different x-, y-, and z-coordinates along the walls, floor, and top of the tanks.  As the sensor node collects data, a neural network model can be applied to generate estimates of the extent and location of damage within the tank (Figure 5).  Training processes for the neural network model allow the system optimization to maximize prediction accuracy using both training and testing datasets collected in the laboratory.   Results obtained to date have shown that the process can be applied to a variety of tests conditions with good performance at different salt concentrations, defect sizes, and spatial distributions.

Figure 5: Neural Network models provide estimates of damage size and location within 3D tank geometries, and have been shown to work at different salt concentrations (0.02 – 0.6 M NaCl)
Figure 5: Neural Network models provide estimates of damage size and location within 3D tank geometries, and have been shown to work at different salt concentrations (0.02 – 0.6 M NaCl)

 

A ruggedized version of the coating condition monitoring system has been fabricated and is undergoing relevant environment testing at the U.S. Navy Research Laboratory’s Corrosion and Marine Engineering facility in Key West, Florida.  Preliminary tests have been conducted to verify that EIS measurements are effective in larger expanses of natural seawater and separation distances up to 10m (Figure 6). These experiments were performed off of a seawall at NRL’s test facility where water is drawn from to fill ballast tank models constructed to study cathodic protection and monitoring systems. 

Figure 6: Field study at NRL Key West to examine EIS measurement response for different defect sizes and separation distances in open seawater.
Figure 6: Field study at NRL Key West to examine EIS measurement response for different defect sizes and separation distances in open seawater.
 

These field trials serve as a transition to relevant environment testing of Luna’s CCM system.  This study will provide a realistic assessment of the technique’s ability to function in natural seawater environments, and at length scales that are representative of shipboard applications.  They will also allow Luna to identify limitations of the current prototype system and implement system level refinements to mature the technology for further testing in operational environments to extend the technology readiness level of the coating condition monitoring system.