Luna has developed a sensor suite that can be used to classify the corrosivity of atmospheres within a structure; ultimately improving asset management.

Improved health management of military aircraft is needed to control the costs of corrosion as the average age of U.S. Military aircraft continues to increase.  It is estimated that 90% of the total life cycle costs occur after aircraft delivery, and the costs due to corrosion continue to escalate as aircraft age [Matzdorf 2003].  There is currently no way to measure atmospheric corrosion of aircraft structures in order to improve individual aircraft or fleet management as part of a comprehensive corrosion prevention and control program.

Maintenance activities should be based on the nature and intensity of ambient corrosion conditions.  A number of studies have been conducted that established relationships between environmental parameters and corrosion of specific alloys.  In general, corrosiveness depends on meteorological conditions of temperature, humidity, and precipitation, along with atmospheric chemicals such as chlorides.  Luna has developed a patent pending sensor suite with an atmospheric corrosion model based on ISO 9223 that can be used to classify the corrosivity of atmospheres within a structure.  By embedding internationally recognized corrosion classification models within a flight capable sensor suite, a continuous measure of atmospheric corrosion of aircraft structures can be obtained for improved asset management.

 

Installation location for wireless and wired corrosivity monitoring system in a NAVAIR UH-1N rotorcraft.
Air temperature and relative humidity recorded by sensor suite within UH-1N rotorcraft.
Surface condensate conductivity and aluminum corrosion rate (AA7075) recorded by sensor suite within UH-1N rotorcraft.

 

Corrosivity classification (C) using environmental and aluminum corrosion rate data measured within UH-1N rotorcraft according to ISO 9223.